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Avoiding Expensive Wage And Hour Litigation As Overtime Rates Are Solidified

 

The Fair Labor Standards Act sets national standards for wage and hour issues related to employees. The law empowers the Department of Labor to set eligibility standards for overtime pay as well as a series of exemptions for it. Employees who qualify for overtime under the law receive time-and-a-half pay for hours worked more than forty hours a week. Time-and-a-half pay is a 50% increase to the employee’s “regular rate of pay.”

The  High Cost Of Misclassification of Workers-Truckers

 

 High cost for Businesses Misclassification

California continues its aggressive moves to protect truck drivers and crack down on misclassification of workers as independent contractors.  The California Labor Commission opened 2019 by awarding 24 drivers who work at the Port of Los Angeles and Port of Long Beach almost six million dollars in compensatory damages in two separate.  Additionally, the Labor Commission held the manager of the 24 drivers personally liable under California law for the damages.  The decision is major sign of California’s ongoing intent to crack down on these issues. 

State And Federal Laws Have Differing Views On  Employer Standards And Rules

Developments over the last few years in federal labor law have generated a lot of discussion and analysis. Regulations and decisions affecting joint employer liability and the definition of employees at the federal level obviously draw the attention of employers. Its easy to overlook though that each state is often free to establish their own standards and tests for determining these questions; those standards may sometimes conflict with federal law.

NJ Businesses With Independent Contractors Expecting Tightening Regulations

The classification of workers as independent contractors or employees continues to draw aggressive state action. These classifications can significantly impact a host of employment-related areas, but the reason why states involve themselves so much in these determinations often center around taxation issues. To this end, New Jersey recently updated its regulations to make it significantly harder for companies seeking an exemption from unemployment taxes to classify their workers as independent contractors, and it will have a big impact on trucking companies.

NLRB Joint Employer Update On Browning-Ferris For Fall 2018

 

 The next step in the long running saga over the Browning Ferris rule has finally arrived. After the National Labor Relations Board issued its decision in Browning-Ferris in 2015, a wave of lawsuits, regulatory challenges, and attempted legislative overrides put the future of that decision into doubt. An overturning of the rule became a key focus of the new administration in charge at the National Labor Relations Board. The board even issued a decision that purported to overturn the rule only to have that decision retracted due to an ethics issue. Now, on September 13, 2018, the Board has issued a new proposed regulation that seek to overturn the Browning-Ferris decision.

Browning-Ferris Goes To The Golden Arches

Issues of joint employment responsibility continue to make headlines across the United States.  Controversy has reigned ever since the National Labor Relations Board issued its decision in Browning-Ferris which changed the standards for establishing when a joint employment relationship exists.  The Board has overturned its Browning-Ferris decision in the intervening years, only to have the case overturning Browning-Ferris itself get overturned due to ethical issues.  States have moved forward with enforcing stricter joint employer liability standards even in the absence of federal action.  Businesses have had to try and re-define their employment relationships in a world of considerable uncertainty.

Misclassification Of Employees Continues To Grow In Importance As More Court Cases Are Decided


Employment law has seen many major disruptions in the past few years. Statutes, regulations, and court cases have continually re-defined who qualifies for overtime, the standards for determining collective bargaining units within a workforce, and how to define an employer. Defining an employer is further complicated by the fractured nature in which employment law is handled in different contexts and at different levels.

Risk Management Is Still A Top Priority, Regardless Of Your Joint Employer Status

In September of 2017, Republicans gained a majority of seats on the National Labor Relations Board. After several months spent relatively quietly, the National Labor Relations Board overturned or reversed a host of decisions and regulations in the first few weeks of December. All the reversals focused on Obama-era policies only in place for a few years.

10 Hiring Resources To Connect CDL Drivers With Businesses

The #1 issue for trucking company owners is finding and retaining quality drivers. Whether you are a business looking to meet your company’s needs, or a CDL licensed driver looking for work; finding the right match can be tough. If you’re a business, how do you know who is qualified? If you’re a driver in need of work, you want to find the right company to work for.

Workers' Comp Risk vs Business Benefits: Contractors Put Into A Tough Spot When Hiring Subcontractors.

Waivers of subrogation present interesting issues in most contracts, but they can pose particular problems within the context of worker’s compensation.  Companies who are not careful with how they manage their contracts can find themselves between a rock and a hard place, with the rock being their own employees and the hard place being companies who contract for their services.