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2021 Update On ELDs For Trucking Companies

The Electronic Logging Device mandate went into full effect on December 16, 2019. The rule was originally mandated by Congress as part of MAP-21. MAP-21 was a piece of legislation signed into law in 2012 aimed at updating several aspects of federal highway and vehicle laws and regulations for the 21st century. It took the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) over three and half a years to finalize the electronic logging device rule. The rule then had a delayed phase-in, with larger carriers having to adopt electronic logging devices early and the smallest companies only having to meet the requirement more recently.

2020 Insurance Market Update Report Q4

The insurance industry is still doing what it can to react to the COVID-19 pandemic. This means situations are changing rapidly within certain sectors of the insurance marketplace. 2020 was already projecting to be a difficult year for insurance markets prior to COVID-19, with property and auto insurance rates seeing significant increases and many carriers reducing capacity in coverage areas like directors and officers liability insurance. The pandemic has only accelerated some of these movements.

Coverage For COVID-19: Business Interruption And How Companies Are Pursuing Necessary Funds in Court

Among the many concerns that have confronted businesses in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic, the issue of business interruption coverage has often loomed large. Many businesses had to shut down operations or at least greatly reduce their operations to comply with state lockdowns and avoid potential civil liability resulting from causing someone’s exposure to the virus. The losses companies faced as a result of these shutdowns easily numbered in the hundreds of billions of dollars.

Blanket Increase In Trucking Insurance Coverage Causing Industry Unease

Trucking companies have faced increasingly large jury verdicts resulting from accidents in recent years. At the same time, the insurance market has tightened, causing rate increases across many lines of commercial insurance. Trucking companies have already faced significant premium hikes over the last few years and were likely to see more of them even in the absence of any major regulatory action.

Compliance Update: 2020 Changes To Hours Of Service For Trucking Company Drivers

On May 14, 2020, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration updated the rules and regulations related to hours of service requirements for the trucking industry. The FMCSA regulates the numbers of hours in day and week that a truck driver can work and also mandates a certain amount of rest time and days off. These regulations exist to limit the number of serious accidents caused by fatigue involving tractor trailers.

HR Insights: Pay Secrecy And How It Affects Employee Morale

There are many reasons why an employer may want to prevent employees from discussing their wages, salaries, bonuses, or other compensation. Pay disparities - even if based on differences in experience, training, or pay - can disrupt the working environment and lead to unhappy employees. Such discussions may lead to an increase in the number of employees demanding raises and seeking new positions if not granted. In the worst-case scenario, the information can lead to discrimination lawsuits with the high legal fees and detrimental reputation damage that such lawsuits cause.

New Truck Driver Training Requirements: What Has Changed?

A significant new regulation regarding the trucking industry has just had its effective date delayed by two years.  The Entry-Level Driver Training (ELDT) rule was originally scheduled to go into effect on February 7, 2020.  Instead, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration has pushed back the rule’s implementation to February 7, 2022.

NLRB Issues New Joint-Employer Final Rule

For the past several years, attempts at the federal and state level to clarify rules on joint employment situations have caused considerable heartburn and anxiety for employers. While several states and the Obama administration attempted to broaden the situations in which companies could be held liable for joint employers, other states and the Trump administration have pushed back and sought to protect many types of companies from being held accountable as joint employers.

NJ Workers May Face New Clarification Standard After CA's AB-5

In the aftermath of California’s aggressive attempts to crack down on the “gig” economy, other states have moved as well, though often in different directions. While many states have moved to pass laws specifically designed to protect the status of “gig” workers, New Jersey is in the process of passing its own attempt to regulate these workers. Indeed, the proposed New Jersey legislation would go so far that it would classify almost all workers in the state as employees and make it incredibly difficult for someone to claim independent contractor status.

Regulation Of The Gig Economy Is Having Spillover Into Trucking Industry

It was expected that California’s Assembly Bill 5 passed late last year would spawn tons of litigation. The law radically changed how workers from uber drivers to television show writers were classified. Those negatively impacted by the law aggressively lobbied for changes and exemptions while planning litigation should their lobbying efforts fail.